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Dare (2021)
Digital Artefact
Banks, E., & White, J. (in press). Dare. [Digital Video]

Synopsis 14 year old Jess is excited when Jake asks her out after a game of Dare one day after school. However, Jake has a particular plan in mind which will change her feelings for him and her approach to relationships forever. 'Dare' is a 15 mi... Read More about Dare.

Feminist and queer arts activism (2020)
Book Chapter
Johnson, C. (2020). Feminist and queer arts activism. In B. Keith Alexander, J. Faber McAlister, & M. Niles Goins (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Gender and Communication. Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429448317

This chapter adopts an historiographic approach to the field of feminist and queer arts activisms, which privileges ideas of affinity and resonance between artists of different generations rather than canonical notions of chronology, precedence and s... Read More about Feminist and queer arts activism.

Maternal art and post-natal wellbeing: Proximity and separation in Lena Simic’s Contemplation Time (2007-8) and Eti Wade’s Jocasta (2008) (2019)
Journal Article
Johnson, C. (2019). Maternal art and post-natal wellbeing: Proximity and separation in Lena Simic’s Contemplation Time (2007-8) and Eti Wade’s Jocasta (2008). Studies in the Maternal, 11(1), https://doi.org/10.16995/sim.263

This article discusses two photographic artworks that challenge popular narratives of failed or achieved maternal femininity. My readings of Lena Simic’s Contemplation Time: a document of maternity leave (2007-8) and Eti Wade’s Jocasta (2008) are inf... Read More about Maternal art and post-natal wellbeing: Proximity and separation in Lena Simic’s Contemplation Time (2007-8) and Eti Wade’s Jocasta (2008).

Whitehall War Graves (2019)
Exhibition / Performance
Goddard, R. Whitehall War Graves. [Digital image files]. Exhibited at Weston Hall, University of West London, St. Mary's Road, London W5 5RF. 1 November 2019 - 2 November 2019. (Unpublished)

This project considers how the material of Portland stone, used as graves stones in CommonWealth War Cemeteries and in buildings in much of central London, signifies memorialisation, power, memorialisation, degradation and decay.