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Molecular community profiling of the bacterial microbiota associated with denture-related stomatitis

Morse, Daniel J.; Smith, Ann; Wilson, Melanie J.; Marsh, Lucy; White, Lewis; Posso, Raquel; Bradshaw, David J.; Wei, Xiaoqing; Lewis, Michael A. O.; Williams, David W.

Authors

Daniel J. Morse

Ann Smith

Melanie J. Wilson

Lucy Marsh

Lewis White

Raquel Posso

David J. Bradshaw

Xiaoqing Wei

Michael A. O. Lewis

David W. Williams



Abstract

Denture-associated stomatitis (DS) affects over two-thirds of denture-wearers. DS presents as erythema of the palatal mucosa in areas where denture-surface associated polymicrobial biofilms containing the fungus Candida albicans exist. The contribution of the oral bacterial microbiota toward the infection is unknown. Therefore, this study characterised the bacterial microbiota of sites within the oral cavity to identify potential associations with occurrence of DS. Denture-wearing patients were recruited (denture stomatitis (DS) n = 8; non-denture stomatitis (NoDS) n = 11) and the oral bacterial microbiota of the tongue, palate and denture-fitting surface was characterised using next-generation sequencing. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified to bacterial genera and species, and presence/absence and relative abundances were examined. A significant (P = 0.007) decrease in the number of OTUs and thus, diversity of the microbiota was observed in tongue samples of DS patients (vs non-DS). The microbiota of denture-fitting surfaces and palatal mucosae were similar. Large differences in the abundance of bacterial genera and species were observed at each sample site, and unique presence/absence of bacteria was noted. Presence/absence and relative abundance of specific bacteria associated with DS warrants further in vitro and in vivo evaluation, particularly as our previous work has shown C. albicans virulence factor modulation by oral bacteria.

Citation

Morse, D. J., Smith, A., Wilson, M. J., Marsh, L., White, L., Posso, R., …Williams, D. W. (2019). Molecular community profiling of the bacterial microbiota associated with denture-related stomatitis. Scientific Reports, 9(1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-46494-0

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jun 27, 2019
Online Publication Date Jul 15, 2019
Publication Date Dec 1, 2019
Deposit Date Oct 2, 2019
Publicly Available Date Oct 4, 2019
Journal Scientific Reports
Electronic ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher Nature Research (part of Springer Nature)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 9
Issue 1
Article Number 10228
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-46494-0
Keywords Multidisciplinary
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/3429011
Publisher URL https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-46494-0
Additional Information Received: 22 January 2019; Accepted: 27 June 2019; First Online: 15 July 2019; : This work was financially supported by an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare case-award PhD studentship, grant number EP/L505390/1. The funders had no specific role in the conceptualisation, design, data collection or analysis, nor the decision to publish the work. Dr David Bradshaw is employed by GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare. No other personal or company-associated financial interests to declare. No non-financial competing interests to declare.

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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.





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