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“Just don’t tell them what’s in it”: Ethics, edible insects and sustainable food choice in schools (2020)
Journal Article
Jones, V. (in press). “Just don’t tell them what’s in it”: Ethics, edible insects and sustainable food choice in schools. British Journal of Educational Research, https://doi.org/10.1002/berj.3655

Supporting young people with global crises mitigation strategies is essential, yet loaded with ethical dilemmas for the educator. This study explores whether young people will make ethical decisions regarding the sustainability of food choices in sch... Read More about “Just don’t tell them what’s in it”: Ethics, edible insects and sustainable food choice in schools.

Edible insects: Applying Bakhtin’s carnivalesque to understand how education practices can help transform young people’s eating habits (2020)
Journal Article
Beynon, S., Benyon, S., & Jones, V. (in press). Edible insects: Applying Bakhtin’s carnivalesque to understand how education practices can help transform young people’s eating habits. Children's Geographies, https://doi.org/10.1080/14733285.2020.1718608

Western European populations are being encouraged to reconsider their diets in light of population growth and the associated intensification of farming systems. In addition, health concerns associated with diets high in sugar, salt and saturated fat... Read More about Edible insects: Applying Bakhtin’s carnivalesque to understand how education practices can help transform young people’s eating habits.

The climate emergency and eating insects: Food for thought (2020)
Journal Article
Jones, V. (in press). The climate emergency and eating insects: Food for thought. Primary Geography,

The children in our classrooms are bombarded with doom and gloom stories about the state of the world: food poverty, war, carbon emissions, water shortages… . Fellow geographers, David Hicks (2018) and Hilary Whitehouse (2018), remind us that we shou... Read More about The climate emergency and eating insects: Food for thought.

Adapting our diets for global climate change: Could eating bugs really be an answer? (2019)
Journal Article
Jones, V. (in press). Adapting our diets for global climate change: Could eating bugs really be an answer?. Teaching Geography, 44(2), 72-74

This article suggests different ways of looking at the global food crisis in the classroom and asks if we can ask our students to consider making radical changes to their diets.

A potent mix: When science and poetry combine (2018)
Journal Article
Jones, V. (2018). A potent mix: When science and poetry combine. Primary Science, 152, 16-18

Teaching science through the unexpected route of poetry can establish new and interesting understandings for learners. This article considers how to merge these two disciplines.

Using geographical knowledge: From floods to deserts, via nappies (2017)
Journal Article
Jones, V. (2017). Using geographical knowledge: From floods to deserts, via nappies. Primary Geography, 28-29

Considering how geography is an ideal vehicle for embedding real world literacy, numeracy and science knowledge in preperation for SATs through a case study.

Communicating environmental knowledges: Young people and the risk society (2004)
Journal Article
Jones, V. (2004). Communicating environmental knowledges: Young people and the risk society. Social and Cultural Geography, 5(2), 213-228. https://doi.org/10.1080/14649360410001690222

In this paper I illustrate how an increased demand for the communication of environmental knowledges in contemporary society can be understood using ideas purported by the risk society thesis. In order to deepen these connections and understandings I... Read More about Communicating environmental knowledges: Young people and the risk society.

Living with plants and the exploration of botanical encounter within human geographic research practice (2004)
Journal Article
Jones, V., & Hitchings, R. (2004). Living with plants and the exploration of botanical encounter within human geographic research practice. Ethics, Place and Environment, 7(1-2), 3-18. https://doi.org/10.1080/1366879042000264741

Explorations of the boundaries between human culture and non-human nature have clear ethical dimensions. Developing both from philosophical arguments about the value of such boundaries and recent empirical work following the traffic across them, we s... Read More about Living with plants and the exploration of botanical encounter within human geographic research practice.


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