Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Virtual reality reduces anxiety and pain in acute hospital palliative care: Service evaluation

Burridge, Nancy; Sillence, Alison; Teape, Lynda; Clark, Ben; Bruce, Emma; Armoogum, Julie; Leloch, Daniella; Spathis, Anna; Etkind, Simon

Virtual reality reduces anxiety and pain in acute hospital palliative care: Service evaluation Thumbnail


Authors

Nancy Burridge

Alison Sillence

Lynda Teape

Ben Clark Ben4.Clark@uwe.ac.uk
Associate Professor of Transport Planning and Engineering

Emma Bruce

Profile Image

Mrs Daniella Leloch Daniella2.Leloch@uwe.ac.uk
Senior Lecturer in Advanced Clinical Practice - CPD

Anna Spathis

Simon Etkind



Abstract

Objectives: Virtual reality (VR) might improve symptom management, but there is limited evidence regarding VR in palliative care. We evaluated the feasibility of VR and impact on anxiety and pain for patients in a hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods: Patients referred to a hospital specialist palliative care team, with anxiety or pain, were offered a VR intervention (a short audiovisual experience). Participants rated anxiety and pain on a 0-10 Likert severity scale pre intervention/post intervention and completed an evaluation form. Change in symptom scores was analysed by parametric statistics. Results: 28 participants used VR a total of 42 times with no adverse events. Mean pain score reduced by 29% from 4.10 (SD=2.71) pre intervention to 2.93 (SD=2.45) post intervention (t(27)=5.150, p<0.001). Mean anxiety scores reduced by 40% from 4.43 (SD=2.56) to 2.65 (SD=2.24) (t(27)=5.058, p<0.001). Patients rated the experience on average 4.75/5 and all would recommend use to a friend. VR was described as absorbing and relaxing. Conclusion: VR may improve anxiety and pain and was acceptable in this setting. Large-scale evaluation will generate important data on feasibility and implementation.

Citation

Burridge, N., Sillence, A., Teape, L., Clark, B., Bruce, E., Armoogum, J., …Etkind, S. (in press). Virtual reality reduces anxiety and pain in acute hospital palliative care: Service evaluation. BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care, https://doi.org/10.1136/spcare-2023-004572

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Aug 24, 2023
Online Publication Date Sep 14, 2023
Deposit Date Aug 18, 2023
Publicly Available Date Oct 15, 2023
Journal BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care
Print ISSN 2045-435X
Electronic ISSN 2045-4368
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Not Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/spcare-2023-004572
Keywords Service evaluation, Psychological care, Pain, Complementary therapy
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/11044520
Additional Information This study won the Marlow Prize at conference and we were invited to write a full report of the study for the BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care journal.

Files

Virtual reality reduces anxiety and pain in acute hospital palliative care: Service evaluation (195 Kb)
PDF

Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Copyright Statement
This article has been accepted for publication in BMJ Publishing Group (2023) following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1136/spcare-2023-004572.

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2023. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.


Virtual reality reduces anxiety and pain in acute hospital palliative care: Service evaluation (43 Kb)
Document

Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Copyright Statement
This article has been accepted for publication in BMJ Publishing Group (2023) following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1136/spcare-2023-004572.

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2023. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.







You might also like



Downloadable Citations