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54 Paediatric traumatic cardiac arrest in England and Wales a 10 year epidemiological study

Vassallo, James; Webster, Melanie; Barnard, Edward; Iniguez, Marisol Fragoso; Lyttle, Mark; Smith, Jason

Authors

James Vassallo

Melanie Webster

Edward Barnard

Marisol Fragoso Iniguez

Mark Lyttle mark.lyttle@uwe.ac.uk

Jason Smith



Abstract

© 2017, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions. INTRODUCTION: Traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) has traditionally been described as futile, with poor outcomes. Reported survival rates vary widely, with higher rates observed from mechanisms leading to a respiratory cause of traumatic cardiac arrest (e.g., drowning and hanging). Currently there is little evidence regarding outcomes following TCA in children. The primary aim of our study was to describe 30 day survival following TCA. Secondary aims were to provide an analysis of injury patterns (severe haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury), describe the functional outcome at discharge and to report the association between survival and interventions performed.METHODS: Using the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) database, we conducted a population-based analysis of all paediatric (

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Dec 1, 2017
Journal Emergency medicine journal : EMJ
Print ISSN 1472-0205
Electronic ISSN 1472-0213
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Peer Reviewed Not Peer Reviewed
Volume 34
Issue 12
Pages A897-A899
APA6 Citation Vassallo, J., Webster, M., Barnard, E., Iniguez, M. F., Lyttle, M., & Smith, J. (2017). 54 Paediatric traumatic cardiac arrest in England and Wales a 10 year epidemiological study. Emergency Medicine Journal, 34(12), A897-A899. https://doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2017-207308.54
DOI https://doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2017-207308.54
Keywords paediatric, traumatic, cardiac arrest, England, Wales, epidemiological study
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2017-207308.54

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