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Global ambitions and local identities: New speakers’ access to linguistic markets and resources

Selleck, Charlotte

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Abstract

A growing body of literature has addressed the ‘complex layers and nuances of today’s multilingual, mobile and global society’ [Barakos & Selleck, 2019, Elite multilingualism: Discourses, practices, and debates. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 40(5), 361]. Heller [2010. The commodification of language. Annual Review of Anthropology, 39, 101–114] argues that the globalised new economy is bound up with transformations of language and identity in many different ways [e.g. Bauman, 1997. Postmodernity and its discontents. London: Routledge; Castells, 2000. The information age: Economy, society and culture (3 vols). Oxford: Blackwell; Giddens, 1990. The consequences of modernity. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University California Press]. This paper examines how these themes play out in Wales, in the relative value placed on Welsh and English by ‘new’ or ‘learner’ speakers of Welsh. These ‘new’ or ‘learner’ speakers have learnt a minority language often through non-traditional routes and this article seeks to understand what linguistic varieties are capitalised by these learners, how they characterise their own language knowledge, and how these ‘new speakers’ position themselves in relation to mobility and the new globalised economy. Additionally, the paper seeks to explore how disparities in terms of access to resources can impact on new speakers’ trajectories–in other words, how different routes to bilingualism are perceived as opening or closing metaphorical doors.

Citation

Selleck, C. (2020). Global ambitions and local identities: New speakers’ access to linguistic markets and resources. Language, Culture and Curriculum, 33(4), 451-466. https://doi.org/10.1080/07908318.2020.1726375

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jan 31, 2020
Online Publication Date Feb 25, 2020
Publication Date Oct 1, 2020
Deposit Date Nov 19, 2018
Publicly Available Date Aug 26, 2021
Journal Language, Culture and Curriculum
Print ISSN 0790-8318
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 33
Issue 4
Pages 451-466
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/07908318.2020.1726375
Keywords Welsh, new speakers, language commodification
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/857024
Publisher URL https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rlcc20/current

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Copyright Statement
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Language, Culture and Curriculum on 25th Feb 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/07908318.2020.1726375. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.”


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Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Publisher Licence URL
http://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved

Copyright Statement
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Language, Culture and Curriculum on 25th Feb 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/07908318.2020.1726375. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.”







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