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Convective stability of carbon sequestration in anisotropic porous media

Hill, Antony A.; Morad, M. R.

Authors

M. R. Morad



Abstract

© 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. The stability of convection in an anisotropic porous medium, where the solute concentration is assumed to decay via a first-order chemical reaction, is studied. This is a simplified model for the interactions between carbon dioxide and brine in underground aquifers; the instability of which is essential in reducing reservoir mixing times. The key purpose of this paper is to explore the role porous media anisotropy plays in convective instabilities. It is shown that varying the ratio of horizontal to vertical solutal diffusivites does not significantly affect the behaviour of the instability. This is also the case for changes of permeability when the diffusion rate dominates the solute reaction rate. However, interestingly, when the solute reaction rate dominates the diffusion rate a change in the permeability of the porous material does have a substantial effect on the instability of the system. The region of potential subcritical instabilities is shown to be negligible, which further supports the novel instability behaviour.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date Oct 8, 2014
Journal Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Print ISSN 1471-2946
Electronic ISSN 1471-2946
Publisher Royal Society, The
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 470
Issue 2170
APA6 Citation Hill, A. A., Hill, A. A., & Morad, M. R. (2014). Convective stability of carbon sequestration in anisotropic porous media. Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 470(2170), https://doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2014.0373
DOI https://doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2014.0373
Keywords anisotropic porous media, stability theory, carbon sequestration
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2014.0373
Additional Information Additional Information : This is the accepted version of an article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A. The final published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2014.0373

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