Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

What are the barriers and facilitators to effective health promotion in urgent and emergency care? A systematic review

Schofield, B; Rolfe, U; McClean, S; Hoskins, R; Voss, S; Benger, J

What are the barriers and facilitators to effective health promotion in urgent and emergency care? A systematic review Thumbnail


Authors

U Rolfe

Profile Image

Dr Stuart McClean Stuart.Mcclean@uwe.ac.uk
Associate Professor Public Health (Health & Wellbeing)

Rebecca Hoskins Rebecca.Hoskins@uwe.ac.uk
Senior Lecturer in Advanced Practice

Sarah Voss Sarah.Voss@uwe.ac.uk
Professor of Emergency and Critical Care

J Benger



Abstract

Background: There are potential health gains such as reducing early deaths, years spent in ill-health and costs to society and the health and care system by encouraging NHS staff to use encounters with patients to help individuals significantly reduce their risk of disease. Emergency department staff and paramedics are in a unique position to engage with a wide range of the population and to use these contacts as opportunities to help people improve their health. The aim of this research was to examine barriers and facilitators to effective health promotion by urgent and emergency care staff. Methods: A systematic search of the literature was performed to review and synthesise published evidence relating to barriers and facilitators to effective health promotion by urgent and emergency care staff. Medical and social science databases were searched for articles published between January 2000 and December 2021 and the reference lists of included articles were hand searched. Two reviewers independently screened the studies and assessed risk of bias. Data was extracted using a bespoke form created for the study. Results: A total of 19 papers were included in the study. Four themes capture the narratives of the included research papers: 1) should it be part of our job?; 2) staff comfort in broaching the topic; 3) format of health education; 4) competency and training needs. Whilst urgent and emergency care staff view health promotion as part of their job, time restraints and a lack of knowledge and experience are identified as barriers to undertaking health promotion interventions. Staff and patients have different priorities in terms of the health topics they feel should be addressed. Patients reported receiving books and leaflets as well as speaking with a knowledgeable person as their preferred health promotion approach. Staff often stated the need for more training. Conclusions: Few studies have investigated the barriers to health promotion interventions in urgent and emergency care settings and there is a lack of evidence about the acceptability of health promotion activity. Additional research is needed to determine whether extending the role of paramedics and emergency nurses to include health promotion interventions will be acceptable to staff and patients.

Citation

Schofield, B., Rolfe, U., McClean, S., Hoskins, R., Voss, S., & Benger, J. (2022). What are the barriers and facilitators to effective health promotion in urgent and emergency care? A systematic review. BMC Emergency Medicine, 22(1), Article 95. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12873-022-00651-3

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date May 13, 2022
Online Publication Date Jun 3, 2022
Publication Date Dec 1, 2022
Deposit Date Jun 16, 2022
Publicly Available Date Jun 17, 2022
Journal BMC Emergency Medicine
Electronic ISSN 1471-227X
Publisher BioMed Central
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 22
Issue 1
Article Number 95
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s12873-022-00651-3
Keywords Paramedic; Emergency medical services; Emergency department; Health promotion; Systematic review
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/9612227
Publisher URL https://bmcemergmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12873-022-00651-3

Files

What are the barriers and facilitators to effective health promotion in urgent and emergency care? A systematic review (910 Kb)
PDF

Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Copyright Statement
© The Author(s) 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http:// creat iveco mmons. org/ licen ses/ by/4. 0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http:// creat ivecommons. org/ publi cdoma in/ zero/1. 0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.






You might also like



Downloadable Citations