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Coping strategies, psychological impact, and support preferences of men with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A multicenter survey

Flurey, Caroline A; Hewlett, Sarah; Rodham, Karen; White, Alan; Noddings, Robert; Kirwan, John

Coping strategies, psychological impact, and support preferences of men with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A multicenter survey Thumbnail


Authors

Karen Rodham

Alan White

Robert Noddings

John Kirwan



Abstract

© 2017 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

Objective: To investigate the existence and distribution of 2 typologies (termed “factors”) of men with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) identified through our previous Q-methodology study (n = 30) in a larger sample of men with RA, and whether differences in psychosocial impact or support preferences exist between the 2 factors, and between men and women with RA.

Methods: A postal survey was sent to 620 men with RA from 6 rheumatology units across England, and the support preferences section of the survey was given to 232 women with RA.

Results: A total of 295 male patients (47.6%) and 103 female patients (44.4%) responded; 15 male participants had missing data, and thus 280 were included in the analysis. Of these, 61 (22%) were assigned to factor A (“accept and adapt”), 120 (35%) were assigned to factor B (“struggling to match up”), and 99 (35%) were unassigned. The two factors differed significantly, with factor B reporting more severe disease, less effective coping strategies, and poorer psychological status. For support, men favored a question and answer session with a consultant (54%) or specialist nurse (50%), a website for information (69%), a talk by researchers (54%), or a symptom management session (54%). Overall, women reported more interest in support sessions than men, with ≥50% of women reporting interest in nearly every option provided.

Conclusion: Some men accept and adapt to their RA, but others (43%) report severe disease, less effective coping, and poor psychological status. Men's preferences for support are practical, with a focus on expanding their knowledge.

Citation

Flurey, C. A., Hewlett, S., Rodham, K., White, A., Noddings, R., & Kirwan, J. (2018). Coping strategies, psychological impact, and support preferences of men with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A multicenter survey. Arthritis Care and Research, 70(6), 851-860. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.23422

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Aug 11, 2017
Online Publication Date Sep 21, 2017
Publication Date Jun 1, 2018
Deposit Date Feb 28, 2018
Publicly Available Date Feb 28, 2018
Journal Arthritis Care and Research
Print ISSN 2151-464X
Electronic ISSN 2151-4658
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 70
Issue 6
Pages 851-860
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.23422
Keywords rheumatoid arthritis, RA, men, masculinity, men's health, survey,
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/869459
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23422
Additional Information Additional Information : This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Flurey, C., Hewlett, S., Rodham, K., White, A., Noddings, R. and Kirwan, J. (2018) Coping strategies, psychological impact and support preferences of men with rheumatoid arthritis: A multicentre survey. Arthritis Care & Research. ISSN 2151-464X, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23422. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

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