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The effects of cycle lanes, vehicle to kerb distance and vehicle type on cyclists' attention allocation during junction negotiation

Ridley, Anne M.; Frings, Daniel; Parkin, John

The effects of cycle lanes, vehicle to kerb distance and vehicle type on cyclists' attention allocation during junction negotiation Thumbnail


Authors

Anne M. Ridley

Daniel Frings

John Parkin John.Parkin@uwe.ac.uk
Professor in Transport Engineering



Abstract

Increased frequency of cycle journeys has led to an escalation in collisions between cyclists and vehicles, particularly at shared junctions. Risks associated with passing decisions have been shown to influence cyclists' behavioural intentions. The current study extended this research by linking not only risk perception but also attention allocation (via tracking the eye movements of twenty cyclists viewing junction approaches presented on video) to behavioural intentions. These constructs were measured in a variety of contexts: junctions featuring cycle lanes, large vs. small vehicles and differing kerb to vehicle distances). Overall, cyclists devoted the majority of their attention to the nearside (side closest to kerb) of vehicles, and perceived near and offside (side furthest from kerb) passing as most risky. Waiting behind was the most frequent behavioural intention, followed by nearside and then offside passing. While cycle lane presence did not affect behaviour, it did lead to nearside passing being perceived as less risky, and to less attention being devoted to the offside. Large vehicles led to increased risk perceived with passing, and more attention directed towards the rear of vehicles, with reduced offside passing and increased intentions to remain behind the vehicle. Whether the vehicle was large or small, nearside passing was preferred around 30% of the time. Wide kerb distances increased nearside passing intentions and lower associated perceptions of risk. Additionally, relationships between attention and both risk evaluations and behaviours were observed. These results are discussed in relation to the cyclists' situational awareness and biases that various contextual factors can introduce. From these, recommendations for road safety and training are suggested. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Journal Article Type Article
Publication Date 2014-11
Journal Accident Analysis and Prevention
Print ISSN 0001-4575
Publisher Elsevier
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 72
Pages 411-421
APA6 Citation Ridley, A. M., Frings, D., & Parkin, J. (2014). The effects of cycle lanes, vehicle to kerb distance and vehicle type on cyclists' attention allocation during junction negotiation. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 72, 411-421. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2014.07.034
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2014.07.034
Keywords cycling, attention, risk, behaviour, passing, eye tracking, collision
Publisher URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2014.07.034
Additional Information Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Accident Analysis and Prevention. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Accident Analysis and Prevention, [72, (November 2014)] DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2014.07.034

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Copyright Statement
NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Accident Analysis and Prevention. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Accident Analysis and Prevention, [72, (November 2014)] DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2014.07.034







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