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Green infrastructure and biodiversity in the city: Principles and design

Sinnett, Danielle

Authors

Danielle Sinnett Danielle.Sinnett@uwe.ac.uk
Associate Professor in Healthy Green Infrastructure



Contributors

Abstract

Globally urbanisation is posing a significant threat to biodiversity. Yet, human health and well-being depend on ecosystem services, which in turn are largely dependent on biodiversity. Despite a range of initiatives and mechanisms to promote nature conservation in cities it is declining. This chapter provides a summary of features in cities that are associated with greater abundance and richness of a number of species often studied in urban environments: birds, butterflies, pollinators and plants. The most common features identified include proximity to natural habitats, habitat heterogeneity, presence of native species, patch size and management practices. This is followed by some suggestions of how green infrastructure could be planned and designed to increase biodiversity. The chapter then finishes with some challenges and opportunities for green infrastructure and nature conservation.

Publication Date Nov 27, 2015
Peer Reviewed Not Peer Reviewed
Pages 87-101
Book Title Handbook on Green Infrastructure: Planning, Design and Implementation
ISBN 9781783473991
Institution Citation Sinnett, D. (2015). Green infrastructure and biodiversity in the city: Principles and design. In D. Sinnett, N. Smith, & S. Burgess (Eds.), Handbook on Green Infrastructure: Planning, Design and Implementation, 87-101. Edward Elgar
Keywords green infrastructure, biodiversity, ecosystem services
Publisher URL http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/handbook-on-green-infrastructure