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The mnemic neglect effect and information about dementia: Age differences in recall

Cheston, Richard; Dodd, Emily; Christopher, Gary; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine

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Authors

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Gary Christopher Gary.Christopher@uwe.ac.uk
Occasional Associate Lecturer - CHSS - AHP

Tim Wildschut

Constantine Sedikides



Abstract

Dementia represents a more immediate threat for older than for younger adults. Consequently, different strategies may be used to defend the self against the threat of dementia. We hypothesised that older (compared to younger) adults are more likely to manifest mnemic neglect (in which information that is threatening to the self is selectively forgotten) to reduce distress for dementia-related information. Fifty-nine participants aged under 50 and 44 participants aged over 50 recalled 24 dementia-related statements that were either high or low in negativity. Participants were randomised to recall statements that referred either to themselves or another person. High-negativity, self-referent statements had the most substantial threat potential. The recall of older (but not younger) participants for high-negativity (vs. low-negativity) dementia-related statements was impaired when these statements referred to the self rather than to another person. These results indicate that older adults evince mnemic neglect in response to self-threatening information about dementia.

Citation

Cheston, R., Dodd, E., Christopher, G., Wildschut, T., & Sedikides, C. (2022). The mnemic neglect effect and information about dementia: Age differences in recall. Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 29(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2020.1842850

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Oct 23, 2020
Online Publication Date Oct 29, 2020
Publication Date Jan 1, 2022
Deposit Date Oct 23, 2020
Publicly Available Date Oct 30, 2021
Journal Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
Print ISSN 1382-5585
Electronic ISSN 1744-4128
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 29
Issue 1
Pages 1-13
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2020.1842850
Keywords Alzheimer’s disease; dementia; memory, short-term; amnesia, anterograde; self-concept; mnemic neglect
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/6804123

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Copyright Statement
This is an Accepted Manuscript version of the following article, accepted for publication in Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition. Cheston, R., Dodd, E., Christopher, G., Wildschut, T., & Sedikides, C. (2022). The mnemic neglect effect and information about dementia: Age differences in recall. Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 29(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2020.1842850. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Copyright Statement
This is an Accepted Manuscript version of the following article, accepted for publication in Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition. Cheston, R., Dodd, E., Christopher, G., Wildschut, T., & Sedikides, C. (2022). The mnemic neglect effect and information about dementia: Age differences in recall. Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 29(1), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2020.1842850. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.







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