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Veblen, Veblenian social practices, and prosperity theology

Wrenn, Mary

Authors

Mary Wrenn Mary.Wrenn@uwe.ac.uk
Senior Lecturer in Economics



Abstract

Abstract: At the turn of the twentieth century (1910), Veblen published an essay which explored the relationship between Christianity and capitalism by focusing on the interaction between the two institutions as they evolved. Veblen’s analysis begins by detailing the evolution of Christianity prior to the age of industrialized capitalism, after which he explores the evolutionary interplay between the two. Just over ten years prior to the publication of this essay (1899), Veblen published the Theory of the Leisure Class while over ten years after the publication of the essay (1923), Veblen dissected the sales efforts of Christianity in a note titled “Salesmanship and the Churches.” Nearly 100 years later, these three works together explain a modern and distinctly American religious movement—Prosperity Theology. This research argues that Prosperity Theology as practiced in the United States over the past nearly half century embodies and integrates all three of these works by Veblen and proposes the conceptual term “Veblenian Social Practice.”.

Citation

Wrenn, M. (2020). Veblen, Veblenian social practices, and prosperity theology. Journal of Economic Issues, 54(1), 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1080/00213624.2020.1720560

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Mar 15, 2019
Online Publication Date Mar 4, 2020
Publication Date Mar 15, 2020
Deposit Date May 5, 2021
Publicly Available Date Sep 5, 2021
Journal Journal of Economic Issues
Print ISSN 0021-3624
Electronic ISSN 1946-326X
Publisher Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 54
Issue 1
Pages 1-18
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/00213624.2020.1720560
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/6017689

Files

This file is under embargo until Sep 5, 2021 due to copyright reasons.

Contact Mary.Wrenn@uwe.ac.uk to request a copy for personal use.




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