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A preliminary evaluation of a client-centred prompting tool for supporting everyday activities in individuals with mild to moderate levels of cognitive impairment due to dementia

Cheston, Richard; Harris, Nigel; Boyd, Hazel; Evans, Nina; Cheston, Richard; Noonan, Krist; Ingram, Thomas; Jarvis, Aron; Ridgers, Jessica

A preliminary evaluation of a client-centred prompting tool for supporting everyday activities in individuals with mild to moderate levels of cognitive impairment due to dementia Thumbnail


Authors

Nigel Harris

Hazel Boyd

Nina Evans

Krist Noonan

Thomas Ingram

Aron Jarvis

Jessica Ridgers



Contributors

Nigel Harris
Project Leader

Hazel Boyd
Project Manager

Nina Evans
Project Manager

Krist Noonan
Project Member

Thomas Ingram
Project Member

Aron Jarvis
Project Member

Jessica Ridgers
Project Member

Abstract

Objectives: Technology-based prompting has the potential to support people with dementia to complete multistep tasks in the home. However, these devices can be complex to use. This paper reports a feasibility trial of a personalised touchscreen digital prompter designed for home use. Methodology: A tablet-based prompter suitable for people living with dementia was developed, along with a detailed guidance manual. Carers loaded instructions for completing the task onto the prompter, and the person with dementia then used the tablet independently to complete a task. Eleven couples used the prompter ‘out-of-the-box’ with no support other than a guidance manual. Results: The majority of participants with dementia could follow the steps on the prompter, and carers were able to breakdown and load tasks onto the prompter. Eight couples used the prompter successfully to complete goals that they had identified in advance. These included preparing simple snacks and using a TV remote control. Successfully achieving goals was associated with more frequent use of the prompting screen on more days, but not higher levels of editing or previewing of tasks. Conclusion: The study provides the preliminary evidence that family caregivers can use a touchscreen tablet, software and manual package to identify specific tasks and break these down into steps and that people living with dementia can then follow the prompts to complete the tasks. This potentially represents an important advance in dementia care. Further testing is required to establish efficacy and to identify any factors that impact on outcomes.

Citation

Jarvis, A., Ridgers, J., Harris, N., Boyd, H., Evans, N., Cheston, R., …Jarvis and Jessica Ridgers, A. (in press). A preliminary evaluation of a client-centred prompting tool for supporting everyday activities in individuals with mild to moderate levels of cognitive impairment due to dementia. Dementia, https://doi.org/10.1177/1471301220911322

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jan 23, 2020
Online Publication Date Apr 4, 2020
Deposit Date Jan 23, 2020
Publicly Available Date Apr 20, 2020
Journal Dementia
Print ISSN 1471-3012
Electronic ISSN 1741-2684
Publisher SAGE Publications
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1177/1471301220911322
Keywords Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia, Audiovisual Aids, Reminder systems, Activities of Daily Living, Technology
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/5213540

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A preliminary evaluation of a client-centred prompting tool for supporting everyday activities in individuals with mild to moderate levels of cognitive impairment due to dementia (354 Kb)
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Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Publisher Licence URL
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Copyright Statement
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).







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