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“Whose bridges? And to where?” Exploring the rational for supplementary schooling: A stakeholder informed case study

Elhaddad, Mohamed

“Whose bridges? And to where?” Exploring the rational for supplementary schooling: A stakeholder informed case study Thumbnail


Authors

Mohamed Elhaddad



Abstract

This research investigates the motives for the establishment of supplementary schools; how the case study school addressed those aspirations; what happens if stakeholders’ needs are divergent; and what can be learnt about the perceived value of supplementary schooling to their stakeholders: parents, learners, and the wider community. A stakeholder informed case study approach is taken to examine community centred supplementary schooling’s role in acting as a linguistic, cultural, religious and social bridge for young people living as citizens of one state and with a parent or parents from elsewhere.
Questionnaires and interviews were used as the principal data collection methods alongside documentary sources, field notes and participant observation, with a narrowing of data collection from a range of diverse supplementary schools down to a case formed of a single school for the children of Islamic ex-patriot Libyans in South-West England. By attempting to give voice to a sample of stakeholders a sample of motives, aspirations and expected outcomes are considered.
Analysis of much of the data uses four main personally identified lenses: Objectives, Curriculum, Community Relations and Administration (O.C.R.A.) framework, drawing from face-to-face semi-structured interviews formed around broad closed and open-ended questions; self-administered questionnaires and some policy analysis. Ethical considerations were governed in accordance with BERA and UWE guidelines.
Two key findings emerge in relation to motives for using supplementary schools: expected length of current and future family residency; and desirability/affordability of accessing linguistic, cultural and religious education for the children of minorities living in a society that does not closely ‘match’ the family’s culture and language - basically revealing a desire to preserve and transfer traits, behaviours and values to the next generation by migrant families.
Regime change in the ‘home/heritage’ setting revealed hidden power relations within the stakeholder group, with dormant but powerful funder interests reasserting control and challenging other stakeholder beliefs around ownership of the case study school. Recommendations therefore relate to free supplementary schooling and vesting vision, aspiration and control in local communities.

Citation

Elhaddad, M. “Whose bridges? And to where?” Exploring the rational for supplementary schooling: A stakeholder informed case study. (Thesis). University of the West of England. Retrieved from https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/1491119

Thesis Type Thesis
Publicly Available Date Jun 24, 2020
Keywords Supplementary Schools, Community Schools, Islamic Education, Libya, Bristol
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/1491119

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