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Public preference of flood-resilient housing technologies in Nigeria: A case study of Kogi State

Ameh, Hope; Lamond, Jessica

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Authors

Hope Ameh

Jessica Lamond Jessica.Lamond@uwe.ac.uk
College Dean for Research & Enterprise



Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore flood-prone area residents' preferences of flood-resilient housing technologies (HTs), to understand the factors influencing their choices. Flood-resilient HTs can reduce damage and disruption at a household level, particularly in areas where large-scale community schemes are not available or feasible. People’s perception of floods and their preferences of flood-resilient HTs are among many very important factors influencing the adoption of these technologies. Therefore, these perceptions and preferences must be well understood before implementation of these technologies can occur. However, studies on these two important factors are lacking in literature, particularly in the sub-Saharan African context.

Design/methodology/approach: Nigerian residents’ preferences of flood-resilient HTs were explored by focusing on five frequently flooded areas around the Niger and Benue river basins in Kogi State, Nigeria. Thirty-eight chat, video and voice call interviews were conducted with participants across five case study areas: Lokoja, Idah, Bassa, Ajaokuta and Koton Karifi. The interviews, informed through an illustrated brochure, covered residents’ experiences and perceptions of floods. This was done to gain an understanding of the factors influencing the choice of flood-resilient HTs adopted and those preferred.

Findings: This study confirms that residents in these five focus areas show similar characteristics to other floodplain residents as encapsulated in protection motivation theory. The flood-resilient HTs discussed in this study include flood-avoidance, flood-recoverability and flood-resistance strategies, as well as neighbourhood-scale approaches. Flood-resistance and flood-recoverability strategies rated highly in terms of suitability and envisaged efficiency in mitigating flooding in Kogi State. Although the measures were mostly agreed to be potentially effective and successful on a household scale, there were concerns as to flood mitigation on a neighbourhood scale.

Research limitations/implications: Pre-existing flood-resilient HTs were not extensively discussed in the literature review but were included to have a sense of the participants’ mitigation behaviour, as well as their potential to adopt (or not) new measures after adopting previous ones.

Originality/value: The results provide supporting evidence of the factors influencing the choice of and/or intention to adopt flood-resilient HTs, highlighted in literature. Results also contribute to literature by providing further insight into flood-resilient measures already adopted by residents, as well as their preferred HTs from the options presented. The implications of these findings and methodological considerations in this research are fully discussed in this paper.

Citation

Ameh, H., & Lamond, J. (in press). Public preference of flood-resilient housing technologies in Nigeria: A case study of Kogi State. International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, https://doi.org/10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2022-0092

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Jul 11, 2023
Online Publication Date Aug 1, 2023
Deposit Date Aug 9, 2023
Publicly Available Date Aug 11, 2023
Journal International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
Print ISSN 1759-5908
Electronic ISSN 1759-5916
Publisher Emerald
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2022-0092
Keywords flood, mitigation, household, Kogi, Nigeria
Public URL https://uwe-repository.worktribe.com/output/11015644

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Copyright Statement
This author accepted manuscript is deposited under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC) licence. This means that anyone may distribute, adapt, and build upon the work for non-commercial purposes, subject to full attribution. If you wish to use this manuscript for commercial purposes, please contact permissions@emerald.com






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