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Extending the boundaries of political communication: How ideology can be examined in super-rich television documentaries using Discursive Psychology (2020)
Book Chapter
Carr, P. (in press). Extending the boundaries of political communication: How ideology can be examined in super-rich television documentaries using Discursive Psychology. In C. Tileagă, S. Burke, & M. Demasi (Eds.), Political Communication: Discursive Perspectives. London: Palgrave MacMillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-60223-9

Political communication is not static and takes a range of forms due to technological change requiring researchers to diversify their interests. When examining talk about wealth inequality, focusing on the overtly political is problematic as issues s... Read More about Extending the boundaries of political communication: How ideology can be examined in super-rich television documentaries using Discursive Psychology.

‘I don’t think there is any moral basis for taking money away from people’: Using discursive psychology to explore the complexity of talk about tax (2018)
Journal Article
Carr, P., Goodman, S., & Jowett, A. (2019). ‘I don’t think there is any moral basis for taking money away from people’: Using discursive psychology to explore the complexity of talk about tax. Critical Discourse Studies, 16(1), 84-95. https://doi.org/10.1080/17405904.2018.1511440

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The increasing recognition of the negative impact of income inequality has highlighted the importance of taxation which can function as a redistributive mechanism. Previous critical soc... Read More about ‘I don’t think there is any moral basis for taking money away from people’: Using discursive psychology to explore the complexity of talk about tax.

The just world hypothesis as an argumentative resource in debates about unemployment benefits (2017)
Journal Article
Goodman, S., & Carr, P. (2017). The just world hypothesis as an argumentative resource in debates about unemployment benefits. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 27(4), 312-323. https://doi.org/10.1002/casp.2314

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The concept of the “just world” is established as a key explanation for how people make sense of inequality so that those deemed to score high in belief in a just world are more likely to hold prejudicial be... Read More about The just world hypothesis as an argumentative resource in debates about unemployment benefits.


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